See you in the funny papers

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21 comments on this post.
  1. Tony:

    I have always heard that ‘See you in the funny papers’ was started by Walt Kelly, creator of the Pogo Comic strip series. He often included special ‘hellos’ to friends in the strip often by naming the boat, street signs, etc. after his friends.

  2. EPR:

    I just remember it from “It’s A Wonderful Life”: ‘See you in the funny papers! Hee Haw!’ :)

  3. Eloise Rochelle:

    When Fiorello LaGuardia was mayor of New York City, from 1934 to 1945, he took to the radio on Sunday mornings and read the funny papers to listeners.

    I still remember how his voice sounded.

    Very New York-y.

  4. Steve Proctor:

    Phase originated before TV. People looked forward to sunday paper funny pages.
    In my opinion you used the term in a sense that they were looking forward to seeing you again and that they enjoy your company just like looking forward to seeing the funny papers!

  5. chris:

    Very famous saying…Sayings today have come along way. Kids change the slang all the time.. Very new york indead.

  6. Poirot:

    Yours is the most correct interpretation for that expression. Hang on to knowledge

  7. Short Review: Robopocalypse, by Daniel Wilson | Third Point of Singularity:

    [...] papers”. Wow. What person living in the 21st century uses a phrase with an etymology that dates back to the 1930s? Robopocalypse is full of howlers of this sort– especially of the macho action film [...]

  8. Cathy:

    My mom was born in 1923. She always said that to me when I was saying goodbye, even when I was very young. I say it to my kids too…

  9. Cathy:

    We used to reply to each other by saying not if I see you first.

  10. Jay Benedict:

    I “found a wealth of fun reading everything!” Thank You!

  11. Anthony:

    My late dad, who would be 100 this year, used to use the phrase. When I first used it around some of my friends, near 50, they stared at me like I was from Mars. Yet, it has caught on and we now commonly use “see you in the funny papers” as a way to say goodbye. ????

  12. JDnHuntsvilleAL:

    “One reason that “See you in the funny papers” sounds so dated to us today is because “funny papers/pages/sheets” was eventually largely replaced by the term “comics” for that part of the newspaper, a process that probably began in the 1940s and was complete by the 1960s.”
    ~
    Uh, I was just coming of age in the 60s, and we always called that section the “funny paper”, or more often just “the funnies” — NEVER the comics. I don’t remember even seeing them referred to as “comics” until recently. To us, “comics” were the bound collections of various funnies sold for a nickle in the local five-and-dime stores.

  13. MIKE HARLO:

    IS IT HOSTILE?

  14. Suzie:

    So “fun” to join this discussion. I’m 48 and my father always said goodnight to us by saying “see you in the funny papers”. He also called a station wagon a beach wagon, the refrigerator an ice box, and coca cola, etc. he called tonic not soda. And yes, we called them The Funnies, never the comics.

  15. The Info Serf:

    So far, I’ve not seen anyone refer to the classic line being uttered in the movie, “O’ Brother, Where Art Thou?” by John Goodman’s character, after delivering a sound thrashing to George Clooney’s character, and then stealing his already-stolen car.

  16. TM2:

    I believe the term originates as a friendly farewell with a bit of wit along the lines of “not if I see you first”. I think the term means “I will see you (or your likeness) when I read the funny papers, as you are a bit of a cartoon-y character”.

  17. Gordon Hoffman:

    I work at a corporatized hospital that implements procedures that are counter intuitive like ones that one might find in a Dilbert comic; as if the comic was an instructional manual. I am not sure which character might represent me, but I feel like I can see me and my coworkers in the Funny Papers.

  18. Barbara Morgan:

    “See you in the funnies” means ‘we’ll share a laugh when I catch up with you later’. I’ve used this expression for years and consider it my signature Bye-Bye equivalent.

  19. Old Trooper:

    I accidentally found my way here when my wife and I used the term “funny papers.” I realized that I must be getting old as I don’t hear that term used anymore. The term, “funny papers” appears to date to circa 1918. We just used some “funny papers” as packaging material for a package to an APO where some “funny papers” may help lighten the mood.

  20. John:

    What a great explanation! I use this expression a lot (and a lot of other antiquated expressions).
    I’ve been going online to find out the history or origins of all these goofy expressions, because half of them, I don’t know their meaning! (and my younger friends look at me with big question marks on their faces.) I think I learned them from my grandparents… and old cartoons.

    thanks for your post!

  21. Sharee:

    I always felt that “see you in the funny papers” meant to imply (beyond its obvious meaning) that life is somewhat absurd and to survive it, and more importantly to thrive, one must first understand that very simple, yet vital truth.

    But, maybe, I was projecting :)

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