Beat the Band

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5 comments on this post.
  1. David Evans:

    I found a 1854 use of the phrase “to beat the band” in The Yale Literary Magazine
    http://books.google.com/books?id=b1ZOAAAAYAAJ&q=%22to+beat+the+band%22&dq=%22to+beat+the+band%22&hl=en&ei=DTMWTdf6K4us8Abm_JnsBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCUQ6AEwAA

  2. Haymoon:

    I have heard an addition to the phrase “to beat Banagher” – in Ireland – “Well that beat Banagher, and Banagher beat the devil”
    Incidentally the town of Banagher which is supposedly the origin of the phrase is in County Offaly in the Irish midlands. There is another Banagher in County Derry in the north of the country

  3. Anonymous:

    Saw it in the Great Gatsby. After Myrtle found out that Wilson had borrowed a suit for their wedding she claimed to have “lay down and cried to beat the band all afternoon”.

  4. MW:

    This reference appears to be from 1954, not 1854.

  5. Kathy:

    Interesting and well researched. Now, however, I am curious about the origins of “likety split!”

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