Glom

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5 comments on this post.
  1. Frank Townend:

    “It never rains, it pours”

    Having learned the new word “glom” and having been invited to visit your wife’s “How Come” Web site, I saw she used the word “glom” twice. Once in the article “Why is soap so slippery?” and again in the article “What is the hot chocolate effect?”

    Small world isn’t it?

  2. Dan Schwartz:

    I’m not too surprised that the original questioner never encountered the word “glom”, as it seems to be used only in limited circumstances. I first heard the word when I worked for a time as a livery cab driver. To “glom” a trip had the very specific meaning of picking up a customer for a short trip and getting paid for it without reporting the trip to the dispatcher, thereby keeping the full fare, rather than just the percentage that you normally got. It was years before I heard the word in any context other than that, and I often wondered where it came from.

  3. Vicky Ayers:

    Of course, there is “Flintheart Glomgold” the arch-rival of Donald Duck’s rich uncle, Scrooge McDuck. Never underestimate the educational power of comic books.

  4. BILL HACKETT:

    I GREW UP IN THE LATE FORTIES AND FIFTIES IN AN IRISH-AMERICAN FAMILY, LET ME TELL YOU THERE WAS LOT OF “GLOMMING” GOING ON AT OUR NINE PERSON DINNER TABLE.

  5. Wine Additives: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly | Wine Folly:

    [...] last longer when they are stable. Many of these aren’t really additives at all, instead they glom (with molecular attraction) onto unwanted particles and are removed from the finished wine. [...]

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