Chesterfield, Sofa, Couch, Settee

Page 2 of 2 | Previous page

11 comments on this post.
  1. Dave Ross:

    Could duo or dufoo be related to duvet?

  2. Aife N.:

    “Dufo” might just be a misspelling of duvet. Interestingly, when I Googled this, Dufo means both (somehow) a dufus and a person that does amazing things for their friends/family. I wouldn’t take this too seriously-Urban Dictionary (where I got this from) was the first result; then this page, then several sites offering to find “Dufo” or to make “Dufo”.

  3. Sofas:

    Oh it’s odd that you mention this – I’ve just purchased a top quality sofa set for my lounge and have to say I absolutely love it! It’s a stunning 3 item set, in brown floral design. Just felt the urge to share that :)

  4. Carole Bender-Resnick:

    In Canada, we call a couch a chesterfield.

  5. Chester Field:

    No no no. In Canada we do not call a couch a chesterfield. In Canada OLD PEOPLE call it a chesterfield!! :)

  6. Radamus:

    I agree with the above chesterfield comment; yes, my nana used to say chesterfield, but I generally say couch.. even sofa is pretty rare nowadays.

    The Canadian military has an affection for the word settee, which generally was observed to be an armless couch.

  7. Ross:

    I do not like the word couch and sofa is still used. Any furniture store has signs saying sofa and chair, not couch and chair. And specialty stores are not called Couchland but Sofaland. But I think terminology has to do with where in North America you live. I looked up this site because I heard a Bare Naked Ladies song today and was reminded that they use the word chesterfield.

  8. Kelley Wright:

    My father used to call the couch something that sounded like dovino or davino, almost like domino. he was born in 1921 in the Midwest. I have never heard this word used by anyone else. Might be related to the above question.

  9. Shannon:

    I have family who grew up in Detroit in the 1910′s-60′s. According to them, the dufo was a couch with a “hide-a-bed”. The bed would fold, or “do fold”, into a couch. That’s how it was explained to me.

  10. Henry:

    Quoting from the text above: ‘The term “couch” itself comes from the French “coucher,” meaning “to lay in place,” reflecting the original sense of a couch as a place for sleeping, not just sitting.’

    Is it a transitive or intransitive verb? Is to “to lay” something or “to lie” down?

  11. chris:

    fascinating…. dufo and especially dufoo especially ring a little French to me… similar to the surname Dufour (when pronounced with a French accent). Chesterfield is a surname and after all Detroit is the French word for straight. If anybody has the time and more ambition than I, perhaps some research into old retailers of furniture in Detroit might turn up something like “Dufour’s Emporium of Fine Settees” 1889-1912….. anyway, words are fun!!

Leave a comment